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The Assembly Line • Cuff Top Sewing Pattern Review

Posted on April 13, 2019

I first came across The Assembly Line over on Instagram, and as soon I saw their fabulous collection I knew I had to contact them to see if they would consider working with me on a wholesale basis... and I'm so pleased that they were open to the idea!

The Assembly Cuff Top Sewing Pattern

The ethos behind the brand is to design contemporary, functional and, at the same time, gorgeous items of clothing for us all to make and cherish. One of the styles that I was particularly drawn to initially was the Cuff Top, shown above, which, at that time, was one of their newest designs. 

The Assembly Line Cuff Top Sewing Pattern in Draper Denim

For my first make I chose our Draper Denim by Robert Kaufman, this lightweight denim has a lovely sheen to it which gives it an elevated look.

The instructions are really clear and easy to follow even though they've been translated from Swedish. I really like that they give you technical tips along with different options for sewing a seam for example.

It's classed as suitable for beginners and I'd say that it is, with no bust darts and grown on sleeves, it sews up really quickly.

The Assembly Line Cuff Top Sewing Pattern

When you sew the elastic to the sleeve it's really important to make sure that the elastic is evenly distributed.

The Assembly Line Cuff Top Sewing Pattern

To do this I recommend that you divide both into four equal sections and use a pin as a marker, as shown in the photo above.

The Assembly Line Cuff Top Sewing Pattern

Next, match these pins first and pin in position, again as shown above, and then stretch the elastic and pin between these points.

The Assembly Line Cuff Top Sewing Pattern

I was so pleased with my first make that I very quickly made a second one, this time in one of our Nani Iro double gauze fabrics.

The Assembly Line Cuff Top Sewing Pattern

The Assembly Line Cuff Top Sewing Pattern

As you can see this style works equally well in both printed and plain fabrics.... for this summer I'm planning to make a dress version simply by tracing off the pattern pieces an lengthening them.

Click here to see the full range of patterns by The Assembly Line.

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Pattern Review • Scout Tee by Grainline Studio

Posted on September 27, 2016
I've seen lots of great versions of the Scout Tee Sewing Pattern by Grainline Studio on Instagram, and as a result of this I was very keen to try this sewing pattern out for myself!
Scout Tee Sewing Pattern by Grainline Studio in nani IRO Saaaa Saar Rondo Yuunagi
This woven tee has capped sleeves and gently curved hem at the back, making it a great wardrobe staple. For my first make I chosen to use one of the nani IRO double gauze fabrics, Saaaa Saar Rondo Yuunagi, the idea being that the simple shape of this style would let this painterly striped design take centre stage.
Scout Tee Sewing Pattern by Grainline Studio in nani IRO's Saaaa Saar Rondo Yuunagi
Instead of using self fabric bias binding for the neckline I chose to use a solid navy for an added internal detail. This is a great modification too if you're a little tight on fabric. I followed the Grainline Studio tutorial on bias facings to achieve a flat bias neckline, with easy to follow step by step instructions and photos it really is helpful.
Scout Tee Sewing Pattern by Grainline Studio in nani IRO's Saaaa Saar Rondo
The Grainline Studio sewing patterns generally have a 1cm seam allowance. As this pattern is so straightforward I decided to French Seam both the side and shoulder seams. This will give a really neat finish on the inside with no frayed edges.
Scout Tee Sewing Pattern by Grainline Studio in nani IRO's Saaaa Saar Rondo

This style really does come together quickly. With the side seams done, the next task is the sleeves. With a little easing these go in nicely.

Scout Tee Sewing Pattern by Grainline Studio in nani IRO's Saaaa Saar Rondo With the sleeves in, all that's left to do are the hems, which again are really straightforward and the binding round the neck.

Scout Tee Sewing Pattern by Grainline Studio in nani IRO's Saaaa Saar RondoI'm really pleased with this pattern, although it's a simple shape, it's still really flattering, and because it's so quick to make it's a style that I'm sure I'll be making again and again.

Scout Tee Sewing Pattern by Grainline Studio in nani IRO Saaaa Saar Rondo Yuunagi

Scout Tee Sewing Pattern by Grainline Studio in nani IRO's Saaaa Saar Rondo

In fact, I liked it so much, I've already started a version using the Metallic Oyster from the Yarn Dyed Essex Linen Range by Robert Kaufman! The simple shape of the Scout Tee means that the fabric can take centre stage, I can see this looking great made up in lots of the nani IRO printed fabrics, the difficulty is deciding which one to choose!

Scout Tee Sewing Pattern by Grainline Studio in Robert Kaufman's Metallic Oyster

 

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Pattern Review • Colette Negroni Menswear Shirt Pattern

Posted on May 11, 2016

We've just road tested the Colette By Walden Negroni Shirt Pattern, and even if we say so ourselves we're pretty pleased with the end result!

Colette Walden Menswear Negroni Shirt Sewing Pattern For our make, we chose the short sleeved version, but the pattern comes with a long sleeved version too, finished with a placket and cuff. We decided to made ours in our Organic Cotton Gingham in Navy.

Colette Negroni Men's Shirt Sewing Pattern

This is the first Colette sewing pattern that we've used and we have to say that we were really impressed. The instructions for the pattern are in a spiral-bound booklet, making it really easy to use, and it has a pocket at the back to store the pattern pieces once you've used them.

Colette Walden Negroni Menswear Shirt Sewing Pattern

We love that the pattern instructions include lots of ideas for customising your sewing project to make it your own. Plus they also refer you to their website for free downloadable variations, such as the pockets for this shirt.

Colette Walden Negroni Menswear Sewing Pattern

The instructions are really comprehensive, taking you through each step in the process of making a well crafted shirt. The instructions also include handy tips, such as how to make perfectly formed patch pockets by cutting a template out of cardboard to help with pressing, simply make it the same size as your pocket piece, minus the folds and seam allowances as we've done below.

We customised our shirt by cutting the pockets on the bias, as shown below, and we used the Small Check Gingham, again in Navy, for the underside of the collar and the inner back yoke. Even small details like these can take your make to a new level; and give you the chance to get creative!

Colette Negroni Men's Shirt Sewing Pattern

This was the first time we'd tackled a garment with an inner back yoke, however our concerns were soon put to rest, as the step by step instructions and illustrations are really clear and before we knew it the need was done!!

The other sewing process that we tried before was "felled seams" these give a long-lasting durable finish and they also give a look very professional to your garment. Again, there are really good instructions for these, seperated out in the sidebar, so that they can easily be referred to, so nothing to fear!

Colette Negroni Men's Shirt Sewing Pattern

These seams are used for both the sleeve and side seams. Once that's done it's pretty straightforward assuming you've made buttonholes before. It's simply a question of hemming the sleeves and body of the shirt, stitching the buttonholes and attaching the buttons.

Colette Negroni Men's Shirt Sewing Pattern

 Colette Walden Menswear Negroni Shirt Sewing Pattern

 

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Pattern Review • Merchant and Mill's The Top 64

Posted on April 05, 2016

We've just finished making The Top 64 by Merchant and Mills and we've thoroughly enjoyed making it. 

Merchant and Mills The Top #64 Sewing PatternThis style is best described as a work-wear garment, an artists smock or a smart jumper. It features in-seam pockets at the front, along with central seams both front and back and raglan sleeves. It's a feminine take on the style and function of a fisherman's top and we love it!

Merchant and Mills The Top 64 in Robert Kaufman's Yarn Dyed Essex Linen

For this style you need a fabric that will hold its shape, so with that in mind we chose to make ours in Robert Kaufman's Yarn Dyed Essex Linen in Black, shown above, it's the perfect weight for this style but has a lovely hand-feel as well.

Merchant and Mills The Top #64 Sewing Pattern

As we've come to expect from the Merchant and Mills sewing patterns, the instructions are clearly laid out and illustrated. And this make was surprisingly easy to sew! It's much easier to make than it looks. The raglan sleeves, for example, are much easier than a set in sleeve, and although there are a lot of pattern pieces, they're all easy to sew together. Plus, you can choose whether or not to top-stitch.

Merchant and Mills The Top #64 Sewing Pattern

Whereas some of the Merchant and Mills patterns have tended to come up a little on the big size, we're really pleased with the fit on this style, the only adjustment made was to shorten the sleeves slightly.

Merchant and Mills The Top #64 Sewing Pattern - Top-stitching

This style lends itself nicely to being top-stitched. We chose to top stitch the central seams, front and back, and the cuff and main hems.You may decide to take it further and top-stitch the bottom panels and the central sleeve seams, or you may prefer not to top-stitch at all.

To get a lovely straight line for our top-stitching we followed Jane, from Jane Makes, advise, and used a low-tack masking tape to mark the stitch-line, which worked a treat!

Merchant and Mills The Top #64 Sewing Pattern

We love how this top has turned out, and it's definitely a style that we'd make again.

Other fabrics that The Top #64 would work well in, as well as any of the other Essex Linens, including the new metallics! This style would also look good in the 8oz Washed Indigo Denim, and you could top-stitch in a traditional gold colour associated with jeans, and the striped Navy & Cream Railroad Denim would also look good too.

Merchant and Mills The Top #64 Sewing pattern

This style would also lend itself well to being adapted, the raglan sleeves are really flattering  and would work well as a short sleeved summer weight top, you might choose to remove the in-seam pockets for this and also possibly the horizontal seam that they're built into.

Merchant and Mills The Top #64 Pattern Hack - Dress

By co-incidence, Merchant and Mills have been working on a pattern hack of this style and have made it into a short sleeved dress, which we think looks fantastic, the hack for this will be available on their website very soon.

We hope we've inspired you to try The Top #64 for yourselves! And don't forget we love to see your sewing projects, so please do email us via the contact page with your photos!

 

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Oliver + S The Carousel Dress

Posted on October 22, 2015

Oliver + S The Carousel Dress Sewing Pattern

We love the contemporary look of the Oliver + S childrens sewing patterns and have had our eye on The Carousel Dress for some time now! The image on the pattern cover shows the dress being worn by a young girl, however the modern panel pieces and top-stitching make it equally suitable for older girls.

For our first make of this pattern we've used Robert Kaufman's Washed Indigo Denim with contrast stitching for a modern look; and we're making View "B" with the smooth hem panel. This pattern has no buttonholes to contend with or set-in sleeves which makes for an easy sewing project.

Oliver + S The Carousel Dress Sewing Pattern

If you're going to top-stitch the dress, it's worth taking the time to experiment with different colours before deciding on the colour to go with. And always worth asking the wearer what she thinks too!

Oliver + S The Carousel Dress Sewing Pattern 

Worth highlighting is the fact that these patterns only have a 1cm seam allowance compared to the more standard 1.5cm, although this is referenced throughout but we thought it worth a mention here too.

Oliver + S The Carousel Dress Sewing Pattern

The instructions are well laid out and very clear. That said, do make sure that you're reading the instructions properly, this might sound obvious, but most of the time when we're sewing we're placing the two "right" sides of the fabric together, so do take care when you pin the pockets to the two side panels that you follow the instructions and pin the WRONG side of the pocket to the RIGHT side of the panel piece! Unlike me the first time round, see the photo above for what not to do!! And below is "take two" with the pockets pinned correctly.

Oliver + S The Carousel Dress Sewing Pattern

Oliver + S The Carousel Dress Sewing Pattern

Other than that our make was pretty straightforward, and came together fairly quickly. We decided against the top-stitching round the hem panel, as for this project we felt it was just a little too much.

Oliver + S The Carousel Dress Sewing Pattern

The button at the back neck is secured with a thread chain loop, this is really easy to do and looks really effective. For detailed instructions click here.

Oliver + S The Carousel Dress Sewing Pattern

We really enjoyed making this pattern and love the end result. This is a style that you could make over and over; and depending on your fabric choices it would look different every time! It would look great for instance in Robert Kaufman's striped Navy & Cream Railroad Denim, or one of our Organic Cotton Ginghams.  A Colour-blocked version in our Organic Cotton Crossweaves would also work really well, as would a patterned version with solid colour cuffs and hem. 

As you can see the possibilities really are limitless! We'd love to see how you make yours, so do send your photos in via the email address in our contact page.

 

 

 

 

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